Sunglasses Trends Part 2

As everyone knows, the main priority for them is in the protection of your eyes against the sun’s rays. However sunglasses hold the distinction of being one of the few safety accessories that can not only reflect a unique personality but can enhance and add to the appeal of the wearer. With the addition of designers stepping in to make sunglasses look fantastic we now see new materials that can be mixed and matched with your mood and moment.

Funky with a hot splash of geometric is now appearing on runways. These can be simple all the way to complex with the addition of colored lenses. Materials can include plastic or metallic, tweaked or squared. The trending term is ‘funky’ and you can take it as far as you want.

Aviator sunglasses have been a mainstay for a number of years and it doesn’t look like they are going away. Designers love them, celebrities depend on them and there is something that just exudes ‘cool’ about this style.

Butterfly wing sunglasses with tinted lenses began last year with a vengeance and are continued to be seen this year. Some of the more extreme butterfly in oversize plastic and a hint of metallic or glam on the sides is something that is newer this year.

Flat topped glasses that have that almost geeky quality are now hot. Who knew? This year there are artistic additions to the flat top area itself and they can be seen in geometric or elaborate designs. The rims can be clear, tinted, or heavy and dark….the choice is all yours.

Cat-eye glasses are one of the most popular on the red carpet. This style may have started in years gone by but it has made a comeback with the look of today. Small, large, half or full rim, the catty cat appearance is being shown in so many colors and materials that it is no wonder that it is still hot.

Sunglasses Trends Part 1

As everyone knows, the main priority for them is in the protection of your eyes against the sun’s rays. However sunglasses hold the distinction of being one of the few safety accessories that can not only reflect a unique personality but can enhance and add to the appeal of the wearer. With the addition of designers stepping in to make sunglasses look fantastic we now see new materials that can be mixed and matched with your mood and moment.

If you have the right facial structure to carry oversize sunglasses, you are in luck. Today’s oversize look is not only hot but can be worn with heavy or light materials and colors. From clear to 60’s ‘mod retro’, there is nothing holding you back for that big sunglasses appeal.

Sci Fi plays a big role in fashion and there is probably no other accessory that exemplifies that look than sunglasses. From futuristic to steampunk, the shape, materials and colors reflect your personal attitude and can be an absolute ‘eye catcher’.

Double wire sunglasses with brow and nose wire are absolutely hot. Add colored lenses and maybe a hint of artwork and your sunglasses become more of a statement than just functional. Many of the designers are coming out with variations on the double-wire look.

Funky in sunglasses is something that is being seen more and more on the catwalk. These can run the gamut from themed sunglasses to those that match an outfit or have a touch of glitz and glam. There doesn’t seem to be any rules on how far funky can go and if this is what you want, there are now an incredible line of choices.

Clear plastic sunglasses, whether they have heavy or light frames are one of the biggest trends. These are now in all shapes and sizes as well as material blends

The Best Sunglasses That Fit the Shape of Your Face

Sunglasses, like standard glasses, should be carefully chosen to fit your unique facial structure. Just because a pair looks great on a celebrity, doesn’t mean that it’s perfect for you. The same kind of thought needs to go into choosing your sunglasses so that no matter where you go, you look absolutely marvelous.

Triangular or heart-shaped faces need a shape that draws the eye downward toward the lower jaw. Sunglasses that are light at the top and a bit heavier at the bottom are a good choice as well as those that may have a touch of color at the lower lens area. This is a perfect shape for Aviator style glasses.

A face that is square-shaped can play with shapes that can be playful, such as cat-eye all the way to curvy looks. You need to balance the angles of the face so you can even choose an oval or rounded-edged rectangles.

For the round face you will want to look at sunglasses that are rectangular as they will bring the eyes upward for balance. Brow bars are a good idea as it accentuates the upper face. Don’t go too large as that will be overpowering.

An oval face can use almost any style that you want with the exception of the completely circular. This facial structure can be playful or adventurous in your choice. This facial structure also gives you the option of going larger, have heavy or lightweight frames.

A diamond-shaped face has the very best of all worlds as you can look fantastic in almost any shape. Whether you choose smaller John Lennon glasses or old Hollywood glamour, you can mix and match your sunglasses more than anyone. Select your sunglasses based on your mood and you can’t go wrong.

The History of Sunglasses Part 3

While most of us don sunglasses for both eye protection and fashion, they actually have a rather long and interesting history. Many of the past civilizations created their own version of sunglasses that were used to block the sun’s rays in both peace time and war.

By 1937, sunglasses became a favorite of millions of women throughout the U.S. It was estimated that twenty million pairs of sunglasses were sold during that time, but only around twenty five percent of Americans that bought them were wearing them for eye protection. In 1936, a gentleman named Edwin H. Land started experimenting with sunglass lenses that were ‘Polarized’. He patented the Polaroid filter and it was then that more people began to recognize the detrimental harm that the sun’s rays could cause to the eyes.

Over the years, each country around the globe has established what is referred to as ‘sunglass standards’. These dictate how much protection the various sunglasses types offer which allows the manufacturers to market them to the consumers. The ratings relate to UV (ultraviolet) protection. At the current time, the world’s largest producer of sunglasses is Xiamen, China. The port in China exports 120 million pairs of sunglasses per year.

The History of Sunglasses Part 2

While most of us don sunglasses for both eye protection and fashion, they actually have a rather long and interesting history. Many of the past civilizations created their own version of sunglasses that were used to block the sun’s rays in both peace time and war.

Items that we recognize as sunglasses today didn’t really become popular until around the early 1920’s. The trend was observed in celebrities and is believed to be one that helped to disguise them so that they could avoid recognition. However, there was also another reason that movie stars of the time wore sunglasses and that was to hide their red eyes. This condition occurred due to the use of incredibly powerful arc lamps that were required for the slow film speed in recording the films. This stereotype transitioned into a kind of fashion statement, even when the lighting had been replaced with ultraviolet filters that didn’t cause red eyes.

The first mass-produced and less expensive sunglasses were created by Sam Foster in 1929 and they were made from celluloid. Foster had found a hot market demand in the Atlantic City, NJ beaches and it was there that he sold his sunglasses under the brand name of ‘Foster Grant’. The name was a combination of his and one found in a Boardwalk ‘Woolworths’. It didn’t take long for this trend to take off and by 1938, Life magazine touted that sunglasses were a ‘new fad for wear on city streets’.

The History of Sunglasses

While most of us don sunglasses for both eye protection and fashion, they actually have a rather long and interesting history. Many of the past civilizations created their own version of sunglasses that were used to block the sun’s rays in both peace time and war.

We can reach back to the ancient Chinese where archeologists have found versions of sunglasses that were used to protect their eyes in the 12th century (or even earlier). The documents that have been located indicate that they made some sunglasses from crystal and judges used them in the courts to hide their facial expressions during witness interrogation. However, the oldest sunglasses are believed to have been worn by the Intuit people. They made their sunglasses out of walrus ivory and there were narrow slits in the eye area to protect them from the harmful sun’s rays.

The Romans also wore sunglasses and it was told that Emperor Nero loved to watch the gladiator fights with sunglasses made of emeralds. These seemed to create more of a mirror-like effect and since Nero was very self-absorbed, he probably wore them as a status symbol.

Around the mid-18th century a gentleman by the name of James Ayscough started experimenting with spectacles that had tinted lenses. These were not what we would call ‘sunglasses’ today as he was interested in the belief that green or blue-tinted glass would correct some vision impairments, including sensitivity to light.